Ecstasy does not wreck the mind, study claims

Previous research was flawed, say experts, but findings will shock those who campaign against the drug's use
The Observer (UK)
Sunday, February 20, 2011

ecstasyThere is no evidence that ecstasy causes brain damage, according to one of the largest studies into the effects of the drug. Too many previous studies made over-arching conclusions from insufficient data, say the scientists responsible for the research, and the drug's dangers have been greatly exaggerated. The study was carried out by a team led by Professor John Halpern of Harvard Medical School and published in the journal Addiction last week.

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